Sugar and power. :: Welcome to Madhucon Sugar and Power Industries Limited :: 2018-12-22

Sugar and power Rating: 6,9/10 942 reviews

Sugar Manipulation

sugar and power

Because the book is technically a work of cultural anthropology, it spends a great deal of time on the specific cultural uses of sugar and their evolution. The book is broken into five chapters of greatly varying quali In Sweetness and Power, a 1985 text by anthropologist Sidney W. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, xxiii-xxviii. I chose it because it relates to the commodities unit in my Global History of Capitalism course on EdX. Of note, this book focuses mostly on the United Kingdom, but also discusses Europe and America to a lesser extent. Madhucon Group, with divergent business interests in mining, construction and finance is committed for industrial development along with social progress.

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Sugar Industry Equipment, Inc.

sugar and power

Amsterdam: Van Loghum Slaterus, 3-20. She is also collaborating with professor Marc McLeod of the University of Seattle to produce an edited volume or special issue of a journal comparing sugar and cane farmers in twentieth-century Latin America. The best parts are the sections on desserts and how ideas of taste and eating changed. Other Involved Parties: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Key Words: sugar, cane farmers, populism, revolution, state-formation, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico. This makes the meaning-related discussions, which could be quite valuable and informative, vacuous claptrap.

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Sweet Talking: A Review of Sidney Mintz’s Sweetness and Power

sugar and power

In my view, this is an excellent way of investigating political economy and culture simultaneously, illuminating the position of classes, genders, races, etc. The chapter is the shortest, and in addition to explaining the anthropological milieu surrounding food history, he notes the rise in English consumption of sugar from the period of 1650 to modernity. Slightly frustrated by that, but I recognize it is a good piece of research. The official allocations of sugar and treacle to the poorhouses in the late 18th cent were similar support measures. Chapter one also explores the origins of sugar and its uses, which apparently began not only as a food item, but was used for medicinal purposes as well as flavoring similar to how spices were used.

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Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History by Sidney W. Mintz

sugar and power

If only more space had been devoted to these. Sweetness and Power is a history of sugar, covering the chemical process in how they made sugar, which countries had dominance over the industry at what times, the role of slavery, how it went from a rarity to a luxery to a commodity, how it so deeply affected the British working class diet, and more. Mintz's approach straddles anthropology, history, and sociology to make sense of how sugar went from obscurity to necessity, and traces the restructurings of the global economy and consumptive patterns along the way. You could probably read this book in 2 or 3 overly-sugared coffee sittings, and it's an enjoyable cafe book. It makes the reader think though, as the question is raised—is the desire for sweetness cultural? In contrast, the cane farmers of Northeastern Brazil seem to have been more hesitant about defining themselves as a separate class from mill owners. I'm just baffled in general by the concept of writing something that's just for your own private information on the Internet.

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Sugar

sugar and power

Mintz argues that it was in the plantations that the first experiments in the capitalist mode of production were attempted -- a controversial position, since the plantations were also based on a captive labor market slaves who were considered no more than capital investment. The first discusses the social and cultural customs associated with food, through the lens of sugar. Sweetness and Power is a book I had to read over my Christmas break for university and there could have been worse books for them to tell me to read, but there also could have been much. The main reason why is that a perfectly fine historical and even science-y narrative is continually interrupted for large swathes of the book by pushy academic theory and paeans to all kinds of dumb social and histor Mintz dives into an endlessly fascinating theme: how and why we came to value a thing sugar and how did it change the way people behave and eat? Because of these anticaking agents, it cannot always be used as a substitute for granulated sugar. New Haven, Yale University Press.

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Sugar

sugar and power

Powdered sugar on Powdered sugar, also called confectioners' sugar, icing sugar, and icing cake, is a finely ground produced by granulated sugar into a powdered state. This reveals the anthropological context in which Mintz writes, as well as background essential to understanding this particular work. He will tell you the same point so many times that if you finish the book and you didn't pick up on a particular fact, that's on you. Europeans at this time did not produce sugar themselves, but avidly imported and traded it as a luxury commodity. The book is told mostly from a European, and even more specifically a British, perspective.

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:: Welcome to Madhucon Sugar and Power Industries Limited ::

sugar and power

It is often dusted onto baked goods to add a subtle sweetness and delicate decoration. In Sweetness and Power, a 1985 text by anthropologist Sidney W. It should be noted that Mintz is really not all that interested Clearly a classic in the world of food studies, and in some ways, definitely worthy of that title. Current Anthropology 41 2 : 169-89. The most common food caster sugar is used in is meringue. But in the 19th century, as the industrial revolution gathered steam, sugar finally made the transition from a luxury or leisure good, to a consumption essential.

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Powdered sugar

sugar and power

Sugar, or sucrose C12H22O11 , is manufactured photosynthetically by green plants. Powdered sugar is utilized in industrial food production when a quick-dissolving sugar is required. In reality, it is mostly Mintz talking about meaning without plainly defining it. All that, and a really fun read! Made me want tea and scones, and I made do with tea and girl scout cookies. I found chapter two most interesting as it discussed the production process for sugar, which was quite sophisticated—quite unlike other plantation commodities such as coffee and tobacco.


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